sixpenceee
sixpenceee:

I think people severely underestimate the power of thoughts and beliefs. 
In 1957, a man known as  “Mr. Wright” was dying of lymph node cancer that had spread through his body. Baseball-sized tumors were visible all over his body. Doctors agreed that NOTHING could possibly save him. 

Mr.Wright did some own personal research and strongly believed a drug called Krebiozen would save him. He convinced the doctors to inject him with it. 
After a single dose of Krebiozen, the tumors shrunk by more than half. Ten days later, he was discharged from the hospital.

However, a few months later Mr. Wright learned that the Krebiozen proved to be ineffective in curing cancer. Immediately, the cancer returned just as bad as before. 
In a desperate attempt to save his life, doctors gave Mr. Wright a “new super-refined double-strength” version of Krebiozen that, they claimed, had just been developed.

The substance was, in fact, just a saltwater solution.

Nonetheless, Mr. Wright’s tumors again miraculously shrunk, and he left the hospital days later. Sadly, a few months after that, he read that no form of Krebiozen had worked on cancer patients, and he promptly died.

But do you think if Mr.Wright hadn’t found out that out about Krebiozen he would’ve lived healthy for many years? The answer is possibly. 
Your mind is a very powerful tool. 
Source:X

sixpenceee:

I think people severely underestimate the power of thoughts and beliefs. 

In 1957, a man known as  “Mr. Wright” was dying of lymph node cancer that had spread through his body. Baseball-sized tumors were visible all over his body. Doctors agreed that NOTHING could possibly save him. 

Mr.Wright did some own personal research and strongly believed a drug called Krebiozen would save him. He convinced the doctors to inject him with it. 

After a single dose of Krebiozen, the tumors shrunk by more than half. Ten days later, he was discharged from the hospital.

However, a few months later Mr. Wright learned that the Krebiozen proved to be ineffective in curing cancer. Immediately, the cancer returned just as bad as before. 

In a desperate attempt to save his life, doctors gave Mr. Wright a “new super-refined double-strength” version of Krebiozen that, they claimed, had just been developed.

The substance was, in fact, just a saltwater solution.

Nonetheless, Mr. Wright’s tumors again miraculously shrunk, and he left the hospital days later. Sadly, a few months after that, he read that no form of Krebiozen had worked on cancer patients, and he promptly died.

But do you think if Mr.Wright hadn’t found out that out about Krebiozen he would’ve lived healthy for many years? The answer is possibly. 

Your mind is a very powerful tool. 

Source:X

thegreenwolf

thegreenwolf:

truffleshuffle12:

baronvonhammersmash:

dirtybetanerd:

kedreeva:

8bitrevolver:

This was meant to be a quick warm up, but it turned into a comic that I’ve wanted to draw for a while. This is something that is extremely important to me, and I appreciate it if you read it.

A while ago, I heard a story that broke my heart. A family went a cat shelter to adopt. The daughter fell in love with a 3-legged cat. The father straight up said “absolutely not”. Because he was missing a leg. That cat was that close to having a family that loved him, but the missing leg held him back. Why?!

Many people have the initial instinct of “nope” when they see an imperfect animal. I get it, but less-adoptable does NOT mean less loveable. 9 out of 10 people will choose a kitten over an adult cat. And those 10% that would get an adult cat often overlook “different” animals.

All I want people to do is be open to the idea of having a “different” pet in their lives. Choose the pet that you fall in love with, but at least give all of them a fair shot at winning your heart.

Don’t dismiss them, they deserve a loving home just as much as any other cat. They still purr, they still love a warm lap, they still play, they still love you. Trust me, next time you are in the market for a new kitty, just go over to that one cat that’s missing an eye and see what he’s all about!

Let me tell to you a thing.

This is Lenore. I first saw her in a little cage at the Petco I frequent (I used to take my parents’ dog in for puppy play time), and she looked like the grouchiest, old, crotchety cat in the world, and I fell instantly in love. She was cranky, she was anti-social, hanging out at the back of her cage. Her fur was matted because she wouldn’t let the groomers near her.

She was perfect.

But I didn’t have a place for her. I wasn’t living in my own space yet, and where I was, I wasn’t allowed cats. So I pressed my face to the bars of her cage and I promised that if no one had adopted her by the time I’d bought a house, I would come back for her.

I visited her every week for over six months while I looked for a house. At one point, they had to just shave her entire rear-end because the mats or fur were so bad. They told me she clawed the heck outta the groomer that did it, screamed the entire time, and spent the next two days growling at anyone that came near the cage.

A couple of weeks later, I closed on my house. I went back and I got an employee, and I said: “That one. I need that cat.”

They got the paperwork and the lady who ran the rescue that was bringing the cats in told me that Lenore (at the time, Lila) was 8 years old, had been owned by an elderly lady who had died, and brought in to a different rescue, who’d had her for six months on top of the time I’d been seeing her at Petco.

This kitty had been living in a 3x3’ cube for over a YEAR because she was older and “less adoptable.”

I signed the paperwork, put her in a cat carrier, and drove her to my new home. I had pretty much nothing; a bed, an old couch, a couple of bookcases, and a tank of mice I called “Cat TV”. I let her out of the carrier and onto my bed, and I told her “I told you I would come back for you when I had a place. It’s not much, but it’s yours too now.”

Lenore spent the next three days straight purring non-stop. She followed me around the house purring. Sat next to me purring. Slept next to me purring. Leaning into every touch, purring, purring, always purring. She still purrs if you so much as think about petting her. She’s amazing, and I love her.

So, you know, if you’re thinking about adopting, and you see a beast that others consider “less adoptable,” think about Lenore.

FUCKING IMPORTANT

THIS POST MAKES ME SO SAD, I JUST WANT TO HUG ALL THE KITTIES ;-;

I did my volunteer hours for school at a cat hospital, but since I didn’t have any vet qualifications, pretty much all I could do was keep the “lifers” (adult cats that had come into the hospital’s care, and pretty much had no chance of being adopted) company. For about nine months I petted, fed, and played with these cats that no one wanted simply because they were old. And yet, these cats had so much love to give. Make no mistake, each lifer had their own personality, but they were all wonderful just the same.

Another thing to keep in mind: if you’re a family with young children, adult cats are less rambunctious and probably safer for little ones. I mean, if your kid is gonna pull the cat’s tail, you’re still gonna have to deal with scratches still, and adult cats still have personalities that may not fit well with your family, but overall adult cats are probably calmer and easier to handle.

TL;DR give adult cats/cats with visible disabilities a chance! They’ve got oodles of love to give, you’ll honestly be surprised!                                                  

People make a big deal out of kittens. I prefer adult cats. The last cat I had was an adult when I got her, and if I ever get a cat again, that one will also be an adult. 

smosh

thecompanionsdoctor:

thecompanionsdoctor:

Whenever my friend says goodnight to me on Skype he sends me this gif

image

and I wanted to send it to him tonight so I went to Google “black man turning off lamp” but Google autofill changed it to “black man turning into jet” and I got this

image

Long story short it’s 1am and I’ve been laughing at this for approximately 20 years

Which one of you assholes brought this back